big mosquito looking bug

What’s That Big Mosquito Looking Bug?

Have you seen a big mosquito looking bug in your room and are not sure what it is? Many homeowners have been experiencing an invasion of what appears to be a giant mosquito bug, but these insects are not actually mosquitoes. They are crane flies, also known as “mosquito hawks.” Crane flies are harmless and do not bite or suck blood like mosquitoes.

They resemble mosquitoes in appearance, with long slender bodies and long legs, but they lack mouth parts for biting. Most Crane Flies do not eat anything as adults and have a short lifespan of only a couple of days. They require an aquatic or damp environment for egg-laying and larval development, just like mosquitoes. Crane Flies tend to congregate around porches and patios because they are attracted to light. While they can be a nuisance during their short lifespan, they are not a chronic pest.

If you have a problem with Crane Flies, you may also be at risk of a mosquito invasion, as both insects require similar environments for their life cycle.

Key Takeaways:

  • Big mosquito looking bugs in your home are most likely crane flies, not actual mosquitoes.
  • Crane flies are harmless and do not bite or suck blood.
  • They have a short lifespan and require an aquatic or damp environment for their life cycle.
  • If you have crane flies, you may also be at risk of a mosquito infestation.
  • Crane flies congregate around porches and patios due to their attraction to light.

What Does a Crane Fly Look Like?

Crane flies, also known as “mosquito hawks,” are winged insects resembling a big mosquito. These oversized mosquito-like bugs have long slender bodies with extremely long legs, giving them their distinctive appearance. They can grow up to 1.5 inches long with a wingspan of 6.5 inches. Their bodies are typically light brown, grey, or tan, and segmented.

The wings of a crane fly are translucent brown or black with prominent veins, providing them with a delicate and intricate look. They have long, thread-like antennae protruding from their heads. However, despite their resemblance to mosquitoes, crane flies do not have mouthparts for biting and feeding.

It’s important to note that crane flies may appear similar to grasshoppers due to their long legs, but they are indeed separate species with distinguishing characteristics.

Physical CharacteristicsDetails
BodiesLong, slender, and segmented
LegsExtremely long
WingsTranslucent brown or black with prominent veins
AntennaeLong and thread-like
MouthpartsAbsent (do not bite or feed)

We hope this description helps you identify and distinguish crane flies from other insects that may resemble them. In the next section, we’ll explore the life cycle and habits of crane fly larvae, as well as effective methods to manage or prevent their infestation.

Crane Fly Larva and How to Get Rid of Crane Flies

The larvae of crane flies, also known as leatherjackets, have an elongated and cylindrical shape, resembling small worms or caterpillars. They can vary in size and color, ranging from pale white, greyish, or brownish to darker shades.

Crane fly larvae feed on decaying plant material, vegetation, organic matter, and roots. They are usually found in moist environments such as damp soil, marshes, or aquatic habitats. While they may be considered pests in gardens and lawns due to potential damage to plant roots, they are generally harmless to humans, livestock, and pets.

To get rid of crane flies, it is best to wait until their population dies off, as they generally have only one generation per year. Keeping the area dry and avoiding excess water can help prevent their infestation. If you are experiencing a problem with crane flies, it is possible that you may also be at risk of a mosquito invasion, as both insects require similar environments for their life cycle.

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